Blog

A Finish - Almost - For Me!

If you follow my Ebay sales, you may recognize this little quilt.  It was on Ebay for a month, but it didn't sell. And to be honest, I was really hoping it wouldn't because I wanted it for myself. I machine quilted it, and had big plans for lots of detail work, but in the end all it "wanted" was ditching and echoes.  And here it is, just waiting for me to add binding this weekend, and it can take its place on the wall over my bed.  (Who needs family portraits when you can have quilts . . . . right???)  

Step Away From the Screen!

Seriously.  If you're a prim and proper, traditional, pink and yellow type quilter, you need to step away from the screen!  Do NOT go any further!  What you will see may change your life forever - or at least your opinion of me!  You see, in my working life, I make New York Beauties and Mariners Compasses. With precise seam allowances and coordinated colors and perfect points (well, I try).  BUT, look what's shaping up for MY bed . . . . .

.

.

.

 

 

Life Begins at the End of your Comfort Zone!

- Maggie

 

 

Wow - is it Thursday already?

So . . . . the first week of my month of personal quilter-development has not exactly gone as expected.  I had a few orders from May left to fill, and well, sometimes life just gets in the way.  Like today.  Tea with a friend this morning, and dog sitting/play date this afternoon.  I did manage to get the top in this picture finished up this afternoon, though, and while its not part of my challenge, I really do like the way it turned out. 

And the Winner is . . . . .

This week, I chose a block called Kitchen Woodbox for our Throwback. I found this pattern in Maggie Malone's book "120 Patterns for Traditional Patchwork Quilts", which I (apparently) gave to my mother for Christmas in 1990.  She'd marked this particular pattern with a big silver star, probably because her married name, and my maiden name was Kitchen.  It looks like a simple enough pattern, if you don't look too closely to the set in seams, but maybe I'll give it a try, just because. 

As a traditional quilt, it might look like this:

A Throwback to Spring

 

And so its Spring in the Annapolis Valley . . . . I took this the other morning from the former railway bridge, now part of the Trans Canada Trail.

\

And the Apple Blossoms are out in full bloom too -

For Throwback Thursday this week, we have a butterfly!  (You thought I forgot again, didn't you!)  

You could go very traditional with this one:

Or rather Modern:

Or give it some some other blocks to play with:

Whatever you do, I'd definitely advise auditioning colors choices; it make a huge difference.

Patience . . . . please!

Given that I'm in serious need of some patience, this Thursdays throwback pattern is "The Patience Quilt".  According to Barbara Brackman's Encyclopedial of Pieced Quilt Patterns, it was published in The Rural New Yorker, in 1933.   I'm guessing you can definitely see the need for some patience!  Great scrap-buster, though!  Here's the quilt (which, for the record, I won't be making!).

Northumberland Star

For this week's Throwback Thursday, I chose the Northumberland Star block.  I didn't have much luck finding its history, but it seems to date back to the 1930's.  

Here is is in a more modern colorway:

A word of caution though, if you decide to try this pattern.  Chose your colors carefully, because the stars tend to disappear if they aren't bright enough to be seen against the background, and you're left with this:

Yup, they are the exact same quilt top, with different color choices.  

The Contrary wife

This week for Throwback Thursday, I chose the Contrary Wife quilt block, maybe because the rain continues to fall, and the sun continues to not shine, and I'm a wee teeny big bit Contrary myself.

The Bride's Quilt

Did you know that once upon a time, a bride was expected to have 13 quilts in her trousseau?  (Or, for that matter, that she was expected to have a "trousseau"?)  Twelve quilts were to use, and one was for very special occasions. You can read more here. And one of the most treasured was, of course, The Double Wedding Ring.

Syndicate content